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Keep Your Patio Doors Draft Free This Winter

This article was written as a response to the question: How do I draft proof my Patio door for the winter?

Patio doors are wonderful to look out without going outdoors, but when they leak air, either hot or cold, they cause a lot of energy loss and that can cost a lot of money as well as making your home uncomfortable.

When your patio door is drafty and winter winds are blowing, you can do something about it. Start by finding out exactly where the draft is coming in. You'll need to tackle different areas in different ways.

Wet your finger and move it close to where it seems the air is coming. You should be able to feel it. If you aren't sure, light a candle or a match and move it slowly around the area. When you find a place where the cold winter air is coming in, the flame will flicker or dance.

If the draft is on the floor, a very long draft dodger, also known as a draft stopper, may be all you need. You can make your own if you're handy with a sewing machine or needle and thread, or you can simply use a rolled up rug or towels to fit snugly against the bottom where the patio door meets the floor.

If the draft is on the side that doesn't slide, use caulking to seal it off. Get clear caulking and put it on as neatly as you can, removing the excess. Make sure to cover the entire area well. After the caulk settles, use a match, a candle or a wet finger to make sure no air is moving through it.

If the draft comes from the side where the patio door slides into the wall, you'll need weather stripping. Put the stripping on the wall side of the patio door and position it so that when the door is closed, there is no winter air coming through. Weather stripping is inexpensive, so if you don't get it just right the first time, try again.

Latches and handles can leak air, too, so check around them carefully. You may be able to tighten them with screws or place washers where they may be loose. If this isn't possible, use clear caulk to seal off the holes, even if they're very small.

The hardest part to fix is where the draft comes in between the two sliding doors. Weather stripping is needed here, but it's difficult to put into place because it needs to go between the doors. If you can't make that work and won't be using the doors during the winter, try stuffing narrow strips of cloth between them. Use a butter knife to push the strips into place.

Another possibility would be to cover the whole thing with plastic on the inside. This may not look very good and it's hard to position such a large piece of plastic, so this option is only for the very desperate and only as a last resort.

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Comments (10)

If your looking to do some renovations at home, or you need to change your patio doors, you can go on this link and learn how to do it, and even get the best prices around for your patio doors... Patio Door

Double Glazing Kidderminster

This blog is such a great help! Winter drafts just make my spine tingle with the cold. Aside from that, it can also give you colds and other illnesses if not taken care of.

Good article writing gal.

Nice job on this one, good info provided.

I'm going over all of your articles wherever I can find them...no winter problems down here but sure would like to keep the air conditioner cold from getting out so much in summer...(which is most of the year LOL)

Voted up. Excellent article. Thanks.

Good tips. I was looking for tips about drafts in general, and these can be used too. I have another one that I recently learned about. Often, cold comes through the glass itself, whether a patio door or window. Bubble wrap, taped, over the glass is supposed to be a great insulator, while it is clear, letting the natural light come through. I have it over one of my windows as a test for the lighting. Yep, light comes through very well. V

Linda, I use bubble wrap over my air conditioners (window units) in the winter. It helps keep the cold out, for sure.

Pat: The bubbles are various sizes and thickness. Some are huge and puffy. Does it make any difference as to the size of the bubbles?

The larger ones are better. The air is the real insulator, so the more air, the better.

Thanks. I was kind of thinking the large ones would be better for that reason. You just confirmed it.

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